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Picking the right high heels shoes for the workplace can make or break your career, well at least your outfit for the day. That being said you should always want to look professional on the job so here are some tips to avoid standing out in the wrong way. Try an avoid wearing extreme high heels like skyscrapers and forget about strappy heels at the office. A low heel 4 inches or less is recommended but a kitten heel under 3 inches is probably best. We are not saying you can’t wear platform pumps to work, we are just saying pick and chose your moments. You wouldn’t want to wear a stiletto heal if your serving tables all day, instead try a block heel or even a wedge bootie if you can’t go without the extra inches they provide.
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Research shows that heels draw attention to long legs and small feet. Some argue that "high-heeled shoes, perhaps more than any other item of clothing, are seen as the ultimate symbol of being a woman."[12] High heels often play a key role in emphasizing a wearer's, most commonly a woman's, arched back and extended buttocks. This "natural courting pose" sexualizes the wearer, and can turn them into objects subjected to the male gaze.[2] This research highlights the emphasis heels place on the appearance of the wearer, instead of their arguably more valuable internal traits such as intelligence, creativity, or strength.
An analysis of the dance-related injuries in 113,084 adolescents in US emergency rooms from 1991–2007 was conducted using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.[52] The most common injury found among the data were sprains and strains which accounted for 52.4% of the data. Additional injuries include back and leg pain, loss of joint mobility in the wearer's knees and blisters. In particular, shoes with a narrow space for the toes can squeeze tightly enough to cause foot deformity.[53] Dancers can add cushioning to the soles of their dancing shoes or inserts to ease the pain during dancing.[20]
Check out GoJane's chunky black platform sandals to stay up on the 90s trend and create a totally artsy look for all of your upcoming music festivals, nights out or just those days when you're feeling a little daring. These throwback heels are the perfect combo of laid-back and stylish, and they're sure to add a little something to your black mini dress or your favorite ripped boy jeans.
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Except if you opt-out or for disputes relating to: (1) your or Forever 21's intellectual property (such as trademarks, trade dress, domain names, trade secrets, copyrights and patents); or (2) violations of the “Content Submission” provision above, ("Excluded Disputes"), you agree that all disputes between you and Forever 21 (whether or not such dispute involves a third party) with regard to your relationship with Forever 21, including without limitation disputes related to these Terms of Use, your use of the Site, and/or rights of privacy and/or publicity, will be resolved by binding, individual arbitration under the American Arbitration Association's rules for arbitration of consumer-related disputes and you and Forever 21 hereby expressly waive trial by jury. As an alternative, you may bring your claim in your local "small claims" court, if permitted by that small claims court's rules, and as long as such matter is only pending in that court. You may bring claims only on your own behalf. Neither you nor Forever 21 will participate in a class action or class-wide arbitration for any claims covered by this agreement. You also agree not to participate in claims brought in a private attorney general or representative capacity, or consolidated claims involving another person's account, if Forever 21 is a party to the proceeding. This dispute resolution provision will be governed by the Federal Arbitration Act. In the event the American Arbitration Association is unwilling or unable to set a hearing date within one hundred and sixty (160) days of filing the case, then either Forever 21 or you can elect to have the arbitration administered instead by the Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services. Judgment on the award rendered by the arbitrator may be entered in any court having competent jurisdiction. Any provision of applicable law notwithstanding, the arbitrator will not have authority to award damages, remedies or awards that conflict with these Terms of Use.
High heels have a long history, dating as far back as the tenth century. The Persian cavalry, for example, wore a kind of boot with heels in order to ensure their feet stayed in the stirrups[citation needed]. Furthermore, research indicates that heels kept arrow-shooting riders, who stood up on galloping horses, safely on the horse.[2] This trend has translated into the popular 21st-century cowboy boot. Owning horses was expensive and time-consuming, so to wear heels implied the wearer had significant wealth.[3] This practical and effective use of the heel has set the standard for most horse-back riding shoes throughout history and even into the present day. Later, in the 12th century in India, heels become visible again. The image of a statue from the Ramappa Temple proves this, showing an Indian woman's foot clad in a raised shoe. Then, during the Medieval period, both men and women wore platform shoes in order to raise themselves out of the trash and excrement filled streets.[4] In 1430, chopines were 30 inches (76 cm) high, at times. Venetian law then limited the height to three inches—but this regulation was widely ignored.[5] A 17th-century law in Massachusetts announced that women would be subjected to the same treatment as witches if they lured men into marriage via the use of high-heeled shoes.[6]

In the UK in 2016 temporary receptionist Nicola Thorp was sent home unpaid after she refused to follow the dress code of firm Portico. Thorp launched an online petition calling for the UK government to "make it illegal for a company to require women to wear high heels at work".[37] Two parliamentary committees in January 2017 decided that Portico had broken the law; by this time the company had already changed its terms of employment.[38][39] The petition was rejected by the government in April 2017 as they stated that existing legislation was "adequate".[40] Existing legislation allows women to be required to wear high heels, but only if it is considered a job requirement and men in the same job are required to dress to an "equivalent level of smartness".[41]


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We, Forever 21, Inc., Forever 21 Global B.V., and our U.S. and European affiliates (collectively, "Forever 21") value our customers and visitors to our websites and respect your concerns about the privacy of your personal data and data security. Our Privacy and Security Policy (the "Privacy Policy") is intended to inform you about the collection and use of your personal data when using our websites and provide you with a safe and secure experience in fashion, style and shopping.

Modern high heels were brought to Europe by emissaries of Shāh Abbās I of Persia in the early 17th century.[7] Men wore them to imply their upper-class status; only someone who did not have to work could afford, both financially and practically, to wear such extravagant shoes. Royalty such as King Louis XIV wore heels to impart status. As the shoes caught on, and other members of society began donning high heels, elite members ordered their heels to be made even higher to distinguish themselves from lower classes.[8] Authorities even began regulating the length of a high heel's point according to social rank. Klaus Carl includes these lengths in his book Shoes: "½ inch for commoners, 1 inch for the bourgeois, 1 and ½ inches for knights, 2 inches for nobles, and 2 and ½ inches for princes."”[9] As women took to appropriating this style, the heels’ width changed in another fundamental way. Men wore thick heels, while women wore skinny ones. Then, when Enlightenment ideals such as science, nature, and logic took hold of many European societies, men gradually stopped wearing heels.[8] After the French Revolution in the late 1780s, heels, femininity, and superficiality all became intertwined.[3] In this way, heels became much more associated with a woman's supposed sense of impracticality and extravagance.
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