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In a 2012 study, Kai-Yu Ho, Mark Blanchette and Christopher Powers, wanted to determine if heel height increased patellofemoral joint stress during walking.[25] The patellofemoral joint refers to junction where the femur and patella meet. The study consisted of eleven participants wearing tracking and reflective markers as they walked across a 10 meter force plated walkway in low, medium and high heels. The study showed that as the height of the heel increased, the ball of the foot experienced an increase in pressure resulting in increased discomfort levels and peak patellofemoral joint stress. The researchers also mentioned that the long term usage of high heels would lead to repetitive overstress of the joint which would result in an increase in pain and eventually, patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis and Patellofemoral pain syndrome.
Heels went out of fashion starting around 1810, and then in 1860 they returned at about two and a half inches. The Pinet heel and the Cromwell heel were both introduced during this time.[12] Their production was also increased with the invention and eventual mass production of the sewing machine around the 1850s. With sewing machines, yields increased as machines could quickly and cheaply "position[n] the heel, stitc[h] the upper, and attac[h] the upper to the sole."[9] This is also a prime example of how the popularity of heels interacts with the culture and technology of the time.
Picking the right high heels shoes for the workplace can make or break your career, well at least your outfit for the day. That being said you should always want to look professional on the job so here are some tips to avoid standing out in the wrong way. Try an avoid wearing extreme high heels like skyscrapers and forget about strappy heels at the office. A low heel 4 inches or less is recommended but a kitten heel under 3 inches is probably best. We are not saying you can’t wear platform pumps to work, we are just saying pick and chose your moments. You wouldn’t want to wear a stiletto heal if your serving tables all day, instead try a block heel or even a wedge bootie if you can’t go without the extra inches they provide.

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