These Terms of Use ("Terms") apply to the website located at forever21.com, the Forever 21 mobile applications, and any other websites or applications associated with Forever 21 brands or products that direct the viewer or user to these Terms (collectively, the "Site"). In these Terms, the terms “Forever 21,” “we,” and “us” refers to Forever 21, Inc. and its respective subsidiaries and affiliated companies.
Modern high heels were brought to Europe by emissaries of Shāh Abbās I of Persia in the early 17th century.[7] Men wore them to imply their upper-class status; only someone who did not have to work could afford, both financially and practically, to wear such extravagant shoes. Royalty such as King Louis XIV wore heels to impart status. As the shoes caught on, and other members of society began donning high heels, elite members ordered their heels to be made even higher to distinguish themselves from lower classes.[8] Authorities even began regulating the length of a high heel's point according to social rank. Klaus Carl includes these lengths in his book Shoes: "½ inch for commoners, 1 inch for the bourgeois, 1 and ½ inches for knights, 2 inches for nobles, and 2 and ½ inches for princes."”[9] As women took to appropriating this style, the heels’ width changed in another fundamental way. Men wore thick heels, while women wore skinny ones. Then, when Enlightenment ideals such as science, nature, and logic took hold of many European societies, men gradually stopped wearing heels.[8] After the French Revolution in the late 1780s, heels, femininity, and superficiality all became intertwined.[3] In this way, heels became much more associated with a woman's supposed sense of impracticality and extravagance.
Cosmetics may be returned if gently used, with the original packaging, and with the original receipt. All other returned or exchanged items must be unwashed, unworn, and undamaged, with all tags attached. Food items, sale merchandise, clearance items, and gift cards / e-gift cards are all final sale items and cannot be returned or exchanged, unless required by law.
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If any provision of these Returns and Exchanges Policy is held to be unlawful, void, or for any reason unenforceable during arbitration or by a court of competent jurisdiction, then that provision will be deemed severable from this Returns and Exchanges Policy and will not affect the validity and enforceability of any remaining provisions. Forever 21's failure to insist upon or enforce strict performance of any provision of this Returns and Exchanges Policy will not be construed as a waiver of any provision or right. No waiver of any of this Returns and Exchanges Policy will be deemed a further or continuing waiver of such term or condition or any other term or condition. Forever 21 reserves the right to change this dispute resolution provision, but any such changes will not apply to disputes arising before the effective date of the amendment. This dispute resolution provision will survive the termination of any or all of your transactions with Forever 21.
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A Mile in Her Shoes is a march in which men wear red high heels and walk a mile in protest of domestic violence. Some academics have suggested that by wearing high heels for such a brief period of time, and making a point of acting like they do not know how to walk properly in them, these men are reinforcing the stereotype that only women can or should wear high heels.[48]
If you made your purchase using a gift card, e-gift card, or store credit, refunds will be issued to the original card that was used. The refund amount will include only the amount paid by you after any discount or reward was applied to the returned item(s) and it will not include any shipping charge paid by you unless you are returning a damaged, defective, or the wrong item was sent to you.
Heels went out of fashion starting around 1810, and then in 1860 they returned at about two and a half inches. The Pinet heel and the Cromwell heel were both introduced during this time.[12] Their production was also increased with the invention and eventual mass production of the sewing machine around the 1850s. With sewing machines, yields increased as machines could quickly and cheaply "position[n] the heel, stitc[h] the upper, and attac[h] the upper to the sole."[9] This is also a prime example of how the popularity of heels interacts with the culture and technology of the time.
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An analysis of the dance-related injuries in 113,084 adolescents in US emergency rooms from 1991–2007 was conducted using data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.[52] The most common injury found among the data were sprains and strains which accounted for 52.4% of the data. Additional injuries include back and leg pain, loss of joint mobility in the wearer's knees and blisters. In particular, shoes with a narrow space for the toes can squeeze tightly enough to cause foot deformity.[53] Dancers can add cushioning to the soles of their dancing shoes or inserts to ease the pain during dancing.[20]
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Heels went out of fashion starting around 1810, and then in 1860 they returned at about two and a half inches. The Pinet heel and the Cromwell heel were both introduced during this time.[12] Their production was also increased with the invention and eventual mass production of the sewing machine around the 1850s. With sewing machines, yields increased as machines could quickly and cheaply "position[n] the heel, stitc[h] the upper, and attac[h] the upper to the sole."[9] This is also a prime example of how the popularity of heels interacts with the culture and technology of the time.
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Refunds will be issued in the original form of payment. Please allow 2-3 weeks from the return ship date for your account to be credited, and 1-2 billing cycles for the credit to appear on your statement. For returns from international and APO/FPO addresses, please allow 4-6 weeks from the return ship date for your account to be credited, and 2-3 billing cycles for the credit to appear on your statement. If you made your purchase using a gift card, e-gift card, or store credit, refunds will be issued to the original card that was used. The refund amount will include only the amount paid by you after any discount or reward was applied to the returned item(s) and it will not include any shipping charge paid by you unless you are returning a damaged, defective, or the wrong item was sent to you.
Alternatively, World War II led to the popularization of pin-up girl posters, which men would often hang in their bunks while at war. Almost all of these girls were pictured wearing high heels, leading to an increase in the relationship between high heels and female sexuality.[3] The tall, skinny stiletto heel was invented in 1950, strengthening the relationship between women, sexuality, and appearance.[10] There was a weakening of the stiletto style during both the late 1960s / early 1970s and also 1990s when block heels were more prominent, followed by a revival in the 2000s.
In a 2012 study, Kai-Yu Ho, Mark Blanchette and Christopher Powers, wanted to determine if heel height increased patellofemoral joint stress during walking.[25] The patellofemoral joint refers to junction where the femur and patella meet. The study consisted of eleven participants wearing tracking and reflective markers as they walked across a 10 meter force plated walkway in low, medium and high heels. The study showed that as the height of the heel increased, the ball of the foot experienced an increase in pressure resulting in increased discomfort levels and peak patellofemoral joint stress. The researchers also mentioned that the long term usage of high heels would lead to repetitive overstress of the joint which would result in an increase in pain and eventually, patellofemoral joint osteoarthritis and Patellofemoral pain syndrome.
In 2015, a group of women were turned away from a film première at the Cannes Film Festival in France for wearing flat shoes, including a woman physically unable to wear heels due to an operation on one of her feet.[35] The women complained that this was a sexist policy which forced women into a stereotyped appearance; festival organisers later responded that there was no official policy on footwear and stated that they would remind red carpet officials of this.[9][36]

High heels have been made from all kinds of materials throughout history. In the early years, leather and cowhide was preferred. As civilizations progressed, silk and patent leather were introduced, while cork and wood were utilized as cheap resources in times of war.[13] After the World Wars and the increase in production of steel, the actual heel was a piece of steel wrapped in some kind of material. This has enabled designers to make heels taller and skinnier without them snapping.[19] The soles below the ball of the foot of Ballroom shoes can also be made of materials like smooth leather, suede, or plastic. [20]
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