In the UK in 2016 temporary receptionist Nicola Thorp was sent home unpaid after she refused to follow the dress code of firm Portico. Thorp launched an online petition calling for the UK government to "make it illegal for a company to require women to wear high heels at work".[37] Two parliamentary committees in January 2017 decided that Portico had broken the law; by this time the company had already changed its terms of employment.[38][39] The petition was rejected by the government in April 2017 as they stated that existing legislation was "adequate".[40] Existing legislation allows women to be required to wear high heels, but only if it is considered a job requirement and men in the same job are required to dress to an "equivalent level of smartness".[41]
Fees and Charges. There is no fee to receive automated telephone calls or text messages from Forever 21, our agents, and independent contractors. However, you may incur a charge for these calls or text messages from your telephone carrier, which is your sole responsibility. Check your telephone plan and contact your carrier for details. You represent and warrant that you are authorized to incur such charges and acknowledge that Forever 21, our agents, affiliates, and independent contractors are not responsible for such charges.
Links to Other Websites. The Sites may contain links to third party owned and/or operated websites. We are not responsible for the privacy practices or the content of such websites. We suggest that you contact these third parties directly for information regarding their privacy, security and data collection and distribution policies prior to providing them with any information.
Modern high heels were brought to Europe by emissaries of Shāh Abbās I of Persia in the early 17th century.[7] Men wore them to imply their upper-class status; only someone who did not have to work could afford, both financially and practically, to wear such extravagant shoes. Royalty such as King Louis XIV wore heels to impart status. As the shoes caught on, and other members of society began donning high heels, elite members ordered their heels to be made even higher to distinguish themselves from lower classes.[8] Authorities even began regulating the length of a high heel's point according to social rank. Klaus Carl includes these lengths in his book Shoes: "½ inch for commoners, 1 inch for the bourgeois, 1 and ½ inches for knights, 2 inches for nobles, and 2 and ½ inches for princes."”[9] As women took to appropriating this style, the heels’ width changed in another fundamental way. Men wore thick heels, while women wore skinny ones. Then, when Enlightenment ideals such as science, nature, and logic took hold of many European societies, men gradually stopped wearing heels.[8] After the French Revolution in the late 1780s, heels, femininity, and superficiality all became intertwined.[3] In this way, heels became much more associated with a woman's supposed sense of impracticality and extravagance.
First things first: How high do you want to go? If you love the look of being a statuesque beauty who towers over the crowd, a pair of sky-high heels for women will definitely do the trick. If you're wearing heels out for a night of dancing with your S.O., consider their height and yours: If you're already pretty tall, pick lower heels or they'll be staring at your chest all night, but if you're a bit vertically challenged, high heels can bring you up to eye level. Also, think about your comfort level: If you're not used to wearing high heels, it's better to choose shoes with a lower, thicker heel that make you feel more stable.
The design of the high French heels from the late 1600s to around the 1720s placed body weight on the ball of the foot, and were decorated with lace or braided fabric (pictured). From the 1730s-1740s, wide heels with an upturned toe and a buckle fastening became popular. The 1750s and 1760s introduced a skinnier, higher heel. The 1790s continued this trend, but added combinations of color. Additionally, throughout all of these decades, there was no difference between the right and left shoe.[10]
The design of the high French heels from the late 1600s to around the 1720s placed body weight on the ball of the foot, and were decorated with lace or braided fabric (pictured). From the 1730s-1740s, wide heels with an upturned toe and a buckle fastening became popular. The 1750s and 1760s introduced a skinnier, higher heel. The 1790s continued this trend, but added combinations of color. Additionally, throughout all of these decades, there was no difference between the right and left shoe.[10]

Passively Collected Information. When you access our Sites, we automatically collect your computer or device’s internet protocol (IP) address and other technical information about your computer or device and website usage, such as your browser type and version, time zone setting, and operating system and platform. We may also collect information about you through social media sites you use to access our Site depending the permissions you have given for access to your information. We also use cookies on our Sites; for more information, please see the “Cookies and Other Tracking Technologies” section below.
Service Providers. We, like many businesses, sometimes hire other companies ("Service Providers") to perform certain business-related functions. Examples include mailing information, maintaining databases, and hosting services. When we employ a Service Provider to perform a function of this nature, we provide it with the information that it needs to perform its specific function, which may include Personal Information and other information that you provide to us via a Site. These companies are authorized to use your Personal Information only as necessary to provide these services to us.
You can opt out of the Google Analytics Advertising Features we use by indicating your preference using the interest-based opt-out link here. Google also provides a complete privacy policy, and instructions on opting out of Google Analytics here. Note that Google’s opt-out mechanism is specific to Google activities and does not affect the activities of other ad networks or analytics providers that we may use.
In the UK in 2016 temporary receptionist Nicola Thorp was sent home unpaid after she refused to follow the dress code of firm Portico. Thorp launched an online petition calling for the UK government to "make it illegal for a company to require women to wear high heels at work".[37] Two parliamentary committees in January 2017 decided that Portico had broken the law; by this time the company had already changed its terms of employment.[38][39] The petition was rejected by the government in April 2017 as they stated that existing legislation was "adequate".[40] Existing legislation allows women to be required to wear high heels, but only if it is considered a job requirement and men in the same job are required to dress to an "equivalent level of smartness".[41]
International Transfers of EU Customers’ Personal Information. The Personal Information that we collect from you may be transferred to, and stored at, a destination outside the European Economic Area ("EEA") in reliance on a variety of compliance mechanisms. including data processing agreements based on the EU Standard Contractual Clauses. It may also be processed by staff operating outside the EEA who work for us or for one of our suppliers. Such staff may be engaged in, among other things, the provision of support services. By submitting your Personal Information, you agree to this transfer, storing or processing. We will take all steps reasonably necessary to ensure that your data is treated securely and in accordance with this Privacy Policy. If you are from the EEA or other regions with laws governing data collection and use that may differ from U.S. law, please note that you are transferring your personal information to the U.S. which does not have the same data protection laws as the EEA and may provide more limited recourse mechanisms, including dissimilar or, at times, weaker data protection rights. With knowledge of these risks, by providing your personal information you consent to: (i) the use of your personal information for the uses identified above in accordance with this Privacy Policy; and (ii) the transfer of your personal information to the U.S. as indicated above.

The design of the high French heels from the late 1600s to around the 1720s placed body weight on the ball of the foot, and were decorated with lace or braided fabric (pictured). From the 1730s-1740s, wide heels with an upturned toe and a buckle fastening became popular. The 1750s and 1760s introduced a skinnier, higher heel. The 1790s continued this trend, but added combinations of color. Additionally, throughout all of these decades, there was no difference between the right and left shoe.[10]
You understand and agree that it is your obligation to make sure the User Content you submit to the Site must not violate the rights of any third party, including copyright, trademark, privacy or other personal or proprietary right(s). You also understand and agree that User Content you submit to the Site must not be and will not contain libelous or otherwise unlawful, abusive, obscene, or otherwise objectionable material in FOREVER 21’s sole discretion. For example, and without limitation, you may not post violent, nude, partially nude, discriminatory, unlawful, infringing, hateful, pornographic or sexually suggestive photos or other content via the Site or other websites such as Facebook or Instagram that may interact with this Site.

Blogs and Public Features of the Sites. Some of our Sites offer publicly accessible blogs, community forums, or public comments sections. You should be aware that any Personal Information you submit there can be read and collected by other users of these forums and could be used to send you unsolicited messages and for other purposes. Our blog and comments section of our site is managed by a third party application that may require you to register to post a comment. We do not have access or control of the information posted to the blog. NONE OF THE INFORMATION THAT YOU PROVIDE USING THESE FEATURES IS PROTECTED BY THIS PRIVACY POLICY. WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR THE PERSONAL INFORMATION YOU CHOOSE TO SUBMIT IN THESE FORUMS OR THE USE OF THAT INFORMATION BY ANY THIRD PARTY. You will need to contact or log into the third party application if you want the Personal Information that was posted to the comments section removed. To learn how the third party application uses your information, please review their privacy policy.

The Terms are effective unless and until terminated by either you or Forever 21. You may terminate the Terms at any time. Forever 21 also may terminate or suspend access to this Site at any time and may do so immediately without notice, if in Forever 21’s sole discretion you fail to comply with any term or provision of these Terms. Upon any termination of the Terms by either you or Forever 21, you must promptly destroy all materials, downloaded or otherwise, obtained from this Site, as well as all copies of such materials, whether made under the terms of this these Terms or otherwise.
It might be awkward, but this is our last chance, so please don't scroll past this. This Tuesday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. Our 2019 fundraiser will be over very soon. 98% of our readers don't give; they look the other way. If you are an exceptional reader who already donated, we sincerely thank you. If all our readers donated just $2.75 today, Wikipedia could thrive for years. Most people donate because Wikipedia is so useful. If Wikipedia gave you $2.75 worth of knowledge this year, take a minute to secure its future with a gift to the Wikimedia Endowment. Show the volunteers who bring you reliable, neutral information that their work matters. Thank you.
×